How U.S. Soccer turned old jerseys into new masks for frontline workers

dhita yudha

The United States Soccer Federation is donating 500 masks made from old national team jerseys to those on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. (Robin Alam/Getty Images)
The United States Soccer Federation is donating 500 masks made from old national team jerseys to those on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. (Robin Alam/Getty Images)

Deep in the bowels of the 19th century Chicago mansion that serves as the headquarters for the United States Soccer Federation, several hundred decades-old U.S. national team jerseys hung on storage racks, gathering dust.

Some of them had been worn in games by the biggest stars in modern men’s and women’s national team history. But even after a December 2019 purge during which the USSF sent many to the former players whose last names were emblazoned on the shirts, much of the inventory remained. Three months later, the coronavirus pandemic hit, and with it a shortage of personal protective equipment for frontline workers. An idea was born: maybe the old jerseys could be turned into functional, virus-mitigating face masks.

Led by its

Read More

How U.S. Soccer turned jerseys into masks for frontline workers

dhita yudha

Deep in the bowels of the 19th century Chicago mansion that serves as the headquarters for the United States Soccer Federation, several hundred decades-old U.S. national team jerseys hung on storage racks, gathering dust.

Some of them had been worn in games by the biggest stars in modern men’s and women’s national team history. But even after a December 2019 purge during which the USSF sent many to the former players whose last names were emblazoned on the shirts, much of the inventory remained. Three months later, the coronavirus pandemic hit, and with it a shortage of personal protective equipment for frontline workers. An idea was born: maybe the old jerseys could be turned into functional, virus-mitigating face masks.

Led by its chief medical officer Dr. George Chiampas, U.S. Soccer had already started working on a number of COVID-19-related initiatives. Now, federation staffers found themselves lurking on Etsy, an online

Read More

American teachers are facing ‘a perfect storm’ of crises amid the coronavirus pandemic

dhita yudha

The compounding stresses of the coronavirus pandemic, the sudden transition to remote learning, and the politicization of schools reopening are burning out teachers.

“I was on the verge of leaving,” an art teacher from Connecticut, who teaches kindergarten through fifth grade but did not want to be identified out of fear of professional retaliation, told Yahoo Finance. “The reason why I stayed truthfully was because of my loan payments.”

According to a survey by Horace Mann of 2,490 educators in the U.S. in June, 34% of them are considering leaving the profession due to the financial stress they’re feeling. 

“It’s like a perfect storm happening right now because the federal government hasn’t passed any legislation to give states any money,” Tish Jennings, an associate professor at the University of Virginia who studies how stress affects teachers, told Yahoo Finance. “ And so when they don’t have enough money in the

Read More

Business groups call for action on fraudulent social media ads

dhita yudha

Some fake adverts receive 250,000 views before they are identified as selling counterfeit goods, says new report. Photo: Getty
Some fake adverts receive 250,000 views before they are identified as selling counterfeit goods, says new report. Photo: Getty

Business groups are calling on social media platforms to tackle fake adverts selling counterfeit goods.

Some 70 major brands have been targeted by false ads on Facebook (FB), Instagram, YouTube and Google (GOOG) according to a report by the Transnational Alliance to Combat Illicit Trade (TRACIT) and the American Apparel and Footwear Association (AAFA).

The fake adverts can receive up to 250,000 views before they are detected says the report.

 “It’s alarming that people are exposed to fraudulent advertisements for counterfeits while they’re thumbing through their social media accounts,” said TRACIT director general Jeffrey Hardy.

“The ads are so professional that they easily deceive consumers into thinking they’re getting a great deal. Instead, they’re being diverted to a rogue website that was built specifically to sell and distribute counterfeits.”

The report

Read More

What Harvard MBA Virtual Admissions Events Are Like

dhita yudha

It was the first virtual graduation in the history of Harvard Business School

The COVID-19 pandemic forced b-schools across the nation to shift their courses online back in March. And following suit, many in-person events and functions had to be canceled only to be brought back in a virtual state.

At Harvard Business School, two primary admissions programs – the Summer Venture in Management Program (SVMP) and Peek Weekend—went virtual this summer due to the pandemic. Despite the fact that attendees didn’t meet in-person, the virtual gatherings still saw great success, according to an article by the HBS Newsroom.

“One silver lining of the coronavirus pandemic is that it provided an opportunity to expand virtual admissions events beyond what we thought was possible,” Kate Bennett, director of marketing for MBA Admissions at HBS, tells Newsroom. “We were able to reach a far higher number of prospective students—an unprecedented number of

Read More

Who’s Winning the Money Race in Your ZIP Code?

dhita yudha

Former Vice President Joe Biden had roughly 400,000 more individual donors than President Donald Trump in the last three months, the latest evidence of Biden’s newfound financial strength, according to a New York Times analysis of Federal Election Commission data.

The estimated donor numbers offer another sign of the nation’s political divisions. From April through June, Biden had more donors than Trump in 26 states, including key battlegrounds like Pennsylvania and North Carolina. Trump led in 24, including critical states like Florida and Arizona.

Biden attracted more donors in urban areas and on the coasts, while Trump had the advantage in rural areas around the country.

The most recent fundraising quarter unfolded as Democratic donors turned their focus to the general election, pouring money into Biden’s campaign and significantly narrowing the cash lead Trump had built by courting donors for his reelection bid since taking office in 2017.

Biden’s best

Read More

3 New York City businesses on what it’s been like reopening in the first U.S. epicenter of the pandemic

dhita yudha

Subscribe to How To Reopen, our weekly newsletter on what it takes to reboot business in the midst of a pandemic.

New York City quickly became the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States this past spring. As the novel coronavirus has spread rapidly elsewhere nationwide, New York has been able to bring cases down and began to reopen businesses this summer, making it a possible blueprint for other American cities once they have the virus under control.

Anyone who has ventured out to a store or small business that is not a grocery store or a pharmacy (which are also quite different than they used to be but remained open during the shutdown) knows that retail experiences and services are not like what they once were. There are a lot of new rules put in place to keep customers and employees safe, which might look very different

Read More

4 tips for bagging one of those mortgage rates under 3%

dhita yudha

You’ve seen the headlines: With the economy in a COVID-19 tailspin, mortgage rates that have been falling and falling have now reached depths below 3% for a 30-year loan.

The national average rate dropped earlier this month to an all-time low 2.98%, according to mortgage giant Freddie Mac, which has been tracking rates since 1971. On Thursday, Mortgage News Daily reported that the average sank to an even more jaw-dropping 2.87%.

But if you’re a homeowner wanting to refinance or a homebuyer ready to make a purchase, you can’t assume that a mortgage lender will always give you one of those spectacularly low rates.

In some cities, different lenders can offer rates that vary by close to one full percentage point, a recent study from LendingTree found.

In other words, Lender X might want to give you a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage at 3.9%. But you might discover that Lender Y

Read More

Supermodel and activist Joan Smalls pledges 50% of her wages to fight racial injustice

dhita yudha

Supermodel and activist Joan Smalls did not only put her voice forward in the battle against systemic racism, she also used her paycheck. Smalls is donating 50% of her salary for the remainder of 2020 to organizations advancing racial equality and justice. 

She joined Yahoo Finance’s “The Final Round” to discuss Donate My Wage, an online platform she launched to inspire people to make similar commitments.

“Like everyone else during the pandemic, it awakened an activist in all of us,” said Smalls, who called out the fashion industry, saying it’s time that it recognized racial injustice and systemic racism.

“Seeing an industry that I love so much, and be silent, in a time that is so important for all of us … I wanted to take action. And in order to do that, I just had to step up and lead by example,” she said.

MILAN, ITALY – FEBRUARY 21:

Read More

Dumb Money Making Smart Stock Picks in Yearlong Robinhood Rally

dhita yudha

(Bloomberg) — One unexpected casualty of the 2020 market will be the popular notion that the pros have it over the amateurs when it comes to choosing stocks.

Top holdings by traders on the Robinhood retail app since the start of the year are up more than 1% on average, compared with a decline of 7% for the typical S&P 500 constituent. An analysis by Bespoke Investment Group shows that stocks usually attract a following on the platform after they suffer big drops, suggesting its newbie day-traders are succeeding at investing’s hardest task: Buying low and selling high.

“While commission-free, low-dollar traders are often viewed as a group who tend to do the opposite of the right thing (to be a little more derisive, ‘dumb money’), the Robinhood data actually suggests the opposite,” George Pearkes, a macro strategist at Bespoke, wrote in a report.

By now, the story is well

Read More