In Picking Up Work Here and There, Many Miss Out on Unemployment Check

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Annie Frodeman, who cobbled together work shifts registering emergency patients at a hospital, and as an airport ramp agent, in her airport safety vest near her home outside Burlington, Vt., July 21, 2020. (John Tully/The New York Times)
Annie Frodeman, who cobbled together work shifts registering emergency patients at a hospital, and as an airport ramp agent, in her airport safety vest near her home outside Burlington, Vt., July 21, 2020. (John Tully/The New York Times)

Annie Frodeman often worked 40 hours a week or more — full time by most lights. She just worked them at two jobs.

Four or five mornings a week before the coronavirus outbreak, she worked as an airport ramp agent for Piedmont Airlines in Burlington, Vermont — hoisting bags on and off planes, refilling the water tanks, and sometimes emptying aircraft lavatories — for less than $15 an hour. The rest of the time she signed up for shifts in the emergency room at University of Vermont Medical Center, registering patients for $20 an hour.

While Burlington is expensive, Frodeman said, the two jobs together provided the income and flexibility that she

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US deaths surpass 1,000 for second straight day, jobless claims rise for first time since March; baseball is back

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Baseball is back The daily U.S. death toll surpassed 1,000 for the second straight day and hospitalizations were again peaking as the paralyzing coronavirus pandemic showed little sign of easing Thursday.

The Johns Hopkins University data dashboard reported 1,195 U.S. deaths Wednesday, high by standards of recent weeks but still only half of the daily toll during the outbreak’s deadly peak in the spring. The Covid Tracking Project, however, showed almost 60,000 people are currently hospitalized, less than 200 short of the highest totals from April. 

The Labor Department reported Thursday that 1.4 million people filed initial applications for unemployment benefits last week, the first weekly increase since March.

Major League Baseball was providing a silver lining, opening its season Thursday. The virus-shortened season comes almost four months late and minus fans in the stands. The Washington Nationals, last year’s World Series champs, were hosting the venerable New York Yankees 

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This online class can help you get your finances in order for just $40

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This online class can help you get your finances in order for just $40
This online class can help you get your finances in order for just $40

TL;DR: Learn how to better handle your money with The Complete Personal Finance Master Class Bundle for $39.99, a 97% savings as of July 23.

Financial anxiety is a very real thing. In fact, about 72% of American adults report feeling stressed about their finances, whether it’s worrying about how to pay rent or feeling crippled by debt. And now that we live in uncertain times, negative feelings surrounding money are understandably heightened.

Don’t let financial anxiety take over your life. The best course of action is to face your issues head-on and do whatever it takes to gain financial freedom. And if you have no idea what that means, the Complete Personal Finance Master Class Bundle can help.

On sale for a limited time, this bundle contains courses on financial management, stock trading, real estate,

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From Asking For Ventilators To Zero Patients

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HOBOKEN, NJ — In late March, as the coronavirus pandemic was sickening both New Jersey residents and their doctors who lacked the protective equipment to deal with it, Hoboken Mayor Ravi Bhalla shared a desperate plea from Hoboken University Medical Center: they needed 13 ventilators for critical care patients, and would run out of the life-saving equipment in a few days.

On March 26, Bhalla held a press conference next to the hospital, saying approximately a third of the hospital’s patients had the virus or were awaiting test results.

A release on the city’s webpage said, “The hospital is also near capacity of ventilators for critical patients, and is soon anticipating an additional surge of patients due to COVID-19.”

A CBS reporter who went to investigate wrote on Twitter on March 26, “I’ve seen 6 people walk into ER in an hour. All in masks. Can hear the cough from

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More Wells Fargo customers say the bank decided to pause their mortgage payments without asking

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In March, Tammi Wilson was checking on her family’s mortgage online at Wells Fargo, when she saw a link to information about COVID-19 on the bank’s website. After clicking through, she provided contact information so she could receive materials on programs at the bank. Days later, she said she returned to the payment page to transmit what she and her husband David owed on their loan. A message popped up saying she had no active accounts and she could not make the payment.

Wilson later learned what had happened. Without her knowledge, the bank had put her into a program that suspended payments on her federally backed loan. Known as forbearance, it is a CARES Act program that aims to help borrowers who are having trouble making their payments because they’ve been hurt by COVID.

Because she had not asked for the bank’s help, Wilson continued to make all her

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Symptoms of COVID-19? Here’s what you can do right now

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Yahoo Life is committed to finding you the best services to help improve your life. We may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Pricing and availability is subject to change.

Telemedicine claims have surged more than 8000 percent during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo: Getty Images)
Telemedicine claims have surged more than 8000 percent during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo: Getty Images)

Developing symptoms of COVID-19 is understandably terrifying. And, if you don’t have a primary care physician or you’re nervous to go to your doctor’s office or local hospital, it’s hard to know what to do.

That’s where telehealth comes in. Many doctor’s offices have shifted to providing healthcare through video chat or over the phone during the pandemic. For patients who don’t already have a provider, services like Amwell, one of the top telehealth platforms in the country, allow for quick and easy access to a doctor without a long wait time, and it’s relatively inexpensive for those who do

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A Week In Seattle, WA, On A $73,000 Salary

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Welcome to Money Diaries where we are tackling the ever-present taboo that is money. We’re asking real people how they spend their hard-earned money during a seven-day period — and we’re tracking every last dollar.

Today: a Clinical Research Coordinator who makes $73,000 per year and spends some of her money this week on a mint plant.

Occupation: Clinical Research Coordinator
Industry: Oncology
Age: 28
Location: Seattle, WA
Salary: $73,000
Net Worth: The only money I have saved is $15,000 in my retirement account, however, my net worth is still negative due to my student loans.
Debt: $180,000 (student loans)
Paycheck Amount (1x/month): $4,700
Pronouns: She/her

Monthly Expenses
Rent: $1,700, of which my boyfriend pays $700 (rent includes utilities)
Student Loans: $0 (My student loans are normally about $1,800 but they are on hold right now while I get my MBA)
Streaming Services: $60
Internet: $50
Pet Insurance: $60 (It’s

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After an online push, Folsom football player gets chance to rehab from brain injury

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Since May 12, former Folsom football player Dylan Richard has been in a hospital after suffering a traumatic brain injury while skateboarding in El Dorado Hills.

Richard spent the first three weeks at UC Davis Medical Center and the last six at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center. On Wednesday morning, Richard left Kaiser to be transported to Craig Hospital via air ambulance. Craig Hospital is located in the Denver suburbs and specializes in TBI injuries.

His mom, Cindy Manzo, joined him on the ambulance flight to Colorado.

“I’m so super excited,” Manzo said. “Super excited that we are out (of Kaiser). He needs that level of care and focus. I’m super excited he’s finally going to Craig Hospital.”

Only two visitors per patient are allowed at Craig Hospital due to COVID-19 restrictions. Cindy Manzo and Dylan’s dad, Paul Richard, will switch off every two weeks so someone is with their son

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Can you visit Baja now? Maybe. Here’s what you need to know

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A water taxi approaches El Arco, Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, 2015. <span class="copyright">(Christopher Reynolds/Los Angeles Times)</span>
A water taxi approaches El Arco, Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, 2015. (Christopher Reynolds/Los Angeles Times)

Is this the time for a vacation in Baja?

Absolutely not, says California’s governor, backed by legions of local and state health officials who discourage nonessential travel and are alarmed by the continued spread of COVID-19 on both sides of the border.

Yes, say scores of Mexican hoteliers and travel industry workers, desperate for income and eager to explain new safety measures.

Check with the U.S. government, and the answer depends on which agency you ask — and whether you’re driving or flying.

Meanwhile, scores of hotels in Baja California have opened in recent weeks, betting that thousands of Americans are ready to head south. Airlines are adding Baja flights too, even as Canada and much of Europe have banned U.S. tourists, and the U.S. has banned tourists from much of Europe.

Baja California Sur’s

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Unemployment showdown + Team Draymond gains allies on dentist bill + Assessors speak out on ‘split-roll’

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Happy Wednesday! You’ve made it to the middle of the week. Treat yourself by taking a break and reading our latest newsletter.

LATEST ON UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS

More than 4 million Californians are paying their bills with help from the special $600 weekly unemployment payments Congress authorized in March as the coronavirus outbreak took hold. That deal expires this week, and lawmakers still are not set on a plan.

Here’s the latest from the team in the McClatchy Washington Bureau:

Senate Republicans are seeking to reduce — but not eliminate — unemployment benefits related to the pandemic that are expiring at the end of this month, so that recipients are not making more money from the benefit than they did while working.

Republicans are rallying behind a reduction in the extra federal benefit. One idea under discussion is to lower the $600 weekly benefit to a flat amount. Another proposal

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