3 New York City businesses on what it’s been like reopening in the first U.S. epicenter of the pandemic

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New York City quickly became the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States this past spring. As the novel coronavirus has spread rapidly elsewhere nationwide, New York has been able to bring cases down and began to reopen businesses this summer, making it a possible blueprint for other American cities once they have the virus under control.

Anyone who has ventured out to a store or small business that is not a grocery store or a pharmacy (which are also quite different than they used to be but remained open during the shutdown) knows that retail experiences and services are not like what they once were. There are a lot of new rules put in place to keep customers and employees safe, which might look very different

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Virus Resurgence Sends A Clear Message To Small Businesses That The Future Remains Uncertain

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Small business owners are contending with some of the most trying economic conditions in recent memory. Suppliers are seeing their orders limited by a hobbled supply chain, shops and retailers are facing lower sales from a financially insecure client base and restaurants and bars are being forced to weigh the needs of their staff against the lower capacity imposed by socially-distanced dining areas.

But the most trying aspect of running a small business in the time of a pandemic is the reality that these conditions may continue for months on end. The U.S. and many other countries are already seeing a resurgence of infections and hospitalizations after just a few weeks of reopening measures.

Small Business Strife

The COVID-19 pandemic has put a halt to many business owners’ innate hopes for future growth. A recent article from William Dunkelberg, the Chief Economist for the National Federation of Independent Business, describes

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How To Support Black Owned Businesses In Waltham

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WALTHAM, MA — Amid civil rights demonstrations sparked by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, many are left wondering how they can help causes of racial equality and support the Black and Brown communities. At Black Lives Matter rallies across Greater Boston area speakers are encouraging participants and allies to support Black-owned businesses.

But what does that mean in Waltham?

There are more than 1,000 black-owned businesses across the state and Black Economic Council of Massachusetts Executive Director Segun Idowu said a good start is to frequent those, including at least a dozen in Waltham.

“It’s a critical moment because people are looking beyond police brutality and seeing it for what it is: a systemic issue,” Idowu said.

That systemic issue is connected to the economy, he said.

Previous Black Lives Matter protests seemed to focus on policing, but today in the context of COVID, it has laid bare

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More Than 200 Businesses Receive HoCo RISE Business Relief Grants

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HOWARD COUNTY, MD — More than 200 Howard County businesses have received grants in the first round of funding issued by the HoCo RISE Business Relief Grant Program. Howard County officials allocated $5.7 million in CARES Act funding toward the grant program to provide financial assistance to businesses in targeted sectors that have been most impacted by the coronavirus and plan to reopen. New grants supporting local childcare businesses and the hotel industry have been established, too.

“All of us are trying to get by and move forward. I applaud those making sacrifices in the hope that we will make an impact and save lives, including Howard County small businesses. The first 203 recipients of these grants provide jobs, value and support to our community, and we want to ensure that they too are able to survive,” said Howard County Executive Calvin Ball. “These grants address immediate needs and ensure

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$20M In Grants For Camden County’s Small Businesses Amid Pandemic

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CAMDEN COUNTY, NJ — Small businesses in Camden County will share in $20 million worth of federal grants amid the coronavirus pandemic, local officials announced Wednesday afternoon.

The county has received federal funds from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act to assist struggling businesses during the coronavirus pandemic. The funding is for both profit and nonprofit organizations, and priority will be given to businesses that have not received state or federal funding already.

“We know the business community, especially the foundation of our economy, small businesses, have been hurting and are in need of dire relief,” Camden County Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli Jr. said. “We need to ensure that every proprietor and principal of a small business has access to these grant funds in order to help maintain and stabilize their operations. Moving forward the grants have the potential to provide a business owner with up to

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Small businesses around the world struggle to survive

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Hour after hour in the dark, Chander Shekhar’s mind raced ahead to morning.

More than three months had dragged by since the coronavirus forced him to shut down his business — a shop racked with vibrantly colored saris, on a block in New York’s Jackson Heights neighborhood once thronged with South Asian immigrant shoppers. Today, finally, merchants were allowed to reopen their doors.

But they were returning to an area where COVID-19 had killed hundreds, leaving sidewalks desolate and storefronts to gather dust. Overnight, the uncertainties of reopening had woken Shekhar nine times.

“This is an invisible enemy that nobody can see,” said Shekhar, who is anxious about the $6,000 monthly rent at his store, Shopno Fashion. “I have worked hard for this for more than 20 years, then I got my shop. It’s not easy to leave it.”

The pandemic’s toll leaves Shekhar reluctant to complain, and he knows

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