Cash and 21 Other Everyday Things Wiped Out by COVID-19

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The coronavirus pandemic has radically altered nearly every aspect of everyday life that people once took for granted. Activities and commodities that were standard just a handful of months ago have become scarce, if not impossible to access. Everything from paper money and coins to buffet restaurants and live concerts are becoming dim and distant memories for Americans. It’s quite possible that future generations won’t recognize a handshake or any of these 21 other items that are disappearing rapidly.

Long before COVID-19 battered the globe, e-commerce and the proliferation of payment apps have been replacing cash transactions. According to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., cash represented just 30% of all payments in 2017. The fear of handling paper money contaminated with the coronavirus has accelerated the digital marketplace. With so many brick-and-mortar businesses closed, there’s a tremendous decrease in in-person transactions.

“Prior to the COVID-19 epidemic, about one-third of Americans … Read More

Symptoms of COVID-19? Here’s what you can do right now

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Telemedicine claims have surged more than 8000 percent during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo: Getty Images)
Telemedicine claims have surged more than 8000 percent during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo: Getty Images)

Developing symptoms of COVID-19 is understandably terrifying. And, if you don’t have a primary care physician or you’re nervous to go to your doctor’s office or local hospital, it’s hard to know what to do.

That’s where telehealth comes in. Many doctor’s offices have shifted to providing healthcare through video chat or over the phone during the pandemic. For patients who don’t already have a provider, services like Amwell, one of the top telehealth platforms in the country, allow for quick and easy access to a doctor without a long wait time, and it’s relatively inexpensive for those who do

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Day cares welcome mask-wearing toddlers as parents struggle to ‘make best decision’ in COVID-19 world

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Sam DeRoze is almost 4 years old. After years of nanny care, he’s supposed to dive into his first organized school experience this fall. But the coronavirus pandemic has his mother mulling.

“I’ll need to see the plan from his preschool before I decide,” says Dianne DeRoze, a business consultant in Leesburg, Virginia. “If it’s safe and a positive experience, that’s valuable. What I don’t want is for him to have a knee-jerk reaction that school is this scary place you get dumped.”

DeRoze is among the millions of parents grappling with sending their children to preschool and babies to day care as cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, spike nationally.

The debate continues to rage among politicians and school officials on fall reopening plans. New York Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week that the city would be providing day care for 100,000 children to help

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Daycares welcome mask-wearing toddlers as parents struggle to ‘make best decision’ in COVID-19 world

dhita yudha

Sam DeRoze is almost 4 years old. After years of nanny care, he’s supposed to dive into his first organized school experience this fall. But the coronavirus pandemic has his mother mulling.

“I’ll need to see the plan from his pre-school before I decide,” says Dianne DeRoze, a business consultant in Leesburg, Virginia. “If it’s safe and a positive experience, that’s valuable. What I don’t want is for him to have a knee-jerk reaction that school is this scary place you get dumped.”

DeRoze is among millions of parents grappling with the pros and cons of sending their children to preschool and babies to day care as cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, spike nationally.

The debate continues to rage between politicians and school officials on fall re-opening plans, while New York Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week that the city would be providing day care

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What’s Safe To Do Right Now? The Most Common COVID-19 Questions, Answered

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With states in various stages of reopening, coronavirus cases are increasing across the country. And without standardized guidelines on how we’re supposed to behave, everyone seems to be living by their own rules.

Many of us are wondering: What is actually safe to do right now? Is it safe to fly or stay at a hotel? What about a road trip? Can you go to the dentist, restaurant or gym? 

HuffPost hosted a COVID-19 Q&A with Dr. Kavita Patel, HuffPost’s medical contributor and a practicing internal medicine physician in Washington, D.C., and Lindsay Holmes, HuffPost’s senior wellness editor, to get answers during this confusing time. Below are the most common questions readers asked during the event and some guidance on what to do:

Is it safe to go to restaurants right now? 

Patel: While there have been no reported cases of contracting the virus from prepared food, there have

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NFL players to be tested daily for COVID-19 first 2 weeks

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NFL players will be tested daily for the coronavirus for at least the first two weeks of training camp, per the league’s new testing protocols.

The NFL and the players’ union reached an agreement Monday as rookies for Houston and Kansas City were set to report to camp. Rookies for other teams begin arriving Tuesday.

Players and all Tier 1, Tier 2, Tier 2M or Tier 3 individuals must test negative two times separated by 72 hours using a nasal swab before initially entering the building to begin physical exams or any form of team activity.

After two weeks of daily testing, if the positivity rate of those tests falls below 5% among players and Tier I and Tier II individuals, as described previously in NFL protocols, testing would go to every other day. If the positivity rate doesn’t fall below that threshold, daily testing would continue until it drops.

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Disappearing cash scares consumers in COVID-19 era

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A social media storm kicked up this month as Chase banking customers panicked when it seemed as if money vanished from their bank accounts. 

Some consumers who expected to be paid via direct deposit claimed during the weekend Twitterstorm that they still had not seen the money yet. 

Oddly enough, some other consumers reported on social media that they were spotting an extra $2,500 or so in their Chase bank accounts – money that didn’t belong to them. 

Chase’s response on Twitter was: “We know some customers (are) reporting seeing incorrect balances in their checking account overnight. This was caused by a technical issue that delayed updates on what displayed on Chase Mobile & Chase Online. We resolved this issue as of 9AM ET and accounts now show current balances.”

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At least 120,000 Americans are needed to test COVID-19 vaccines. A ‘very encouraging’ 107,000 are so far signed up.

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At a time when some Americans are concerned about the safety of a COVID-19 vaccine, tens of thousands have already volunteered to help bring one into existence.

As of last week, more than 107,000 people had signed up to take part in testing.

“That’s why we’re optimistic that we’re going to be able to get the trials enrolled in an expeditious way. I think we can do what we need to do,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

The milestone was reached just a week after the National Institutes of Health launched a clinical trial network for vaccines and other prevention tools to fight the pandemic.

More are still needed but the initial surge will go a long way toward filling the requirement for at least 30,000 volunteers each for the four companies that plan to launch Phase 3 clinical trials of

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This yoga studio went online after COVID-19 hit. It’s abandoning its space to survive

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The COVID-19 crisis forced Dharma Yoga Studio in Coconut Grove to quickly pivot to a fully online model. The idea was to offer a variety of Zoom classes for a few months to get through the lockdown, and then return to the cozy ground-floor studio that had become an integral part of the Grove since 2009.

But as the pandemic dragged on and case numbers continued to hit records in Florida, the small business had to make a choice: continue paying rent or pay the few teachers that remain with the studio. So Dharma canceled its lease in late June and shut down the brick-and-mortar studio indefinitely, with no short-term plan to reopen, said owner Natalie Morales.

“Emotionally it was a hard decision to make, but logistically it was the best solution for the studio and especially for the teachers,” she said.

In this Zoom meeting screenshot, Natalie Morales teaches a yoga class after her Dharma Studio moved all programs online in mid-March.
In this Zoom meeting screenshot, Natalie Morales teaches
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Walmart, Lowe’s, Aldi, Target among retailers adding face masks requirements due to COVID-19. See the full list.

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The nation’s largest retailers are now requiring what some states and cities won’t: the use of face masks.

Walmart, Target, CVS, Walgreens and Kroger are the biggest to announce they will soon mandate masks at stores nationwide joining the list of businesses with face covering requirements growing as COVID-19 cases rise. The coronavirus causes the disease COVID-19.

Nearly 40 states now require masks in public places with Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado adding mandates and Ohio requiring masks in a dozen counties. One state went in the opposite direction this week whenGeorgia Gov. Brian Kemp suspended all local government mask orders Wednesday. 

Individual businesses can choose to institute further restrictions and the National Retail Federation is encouraging retailers to set nationwide mask policies to protect shoppers and employees.

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Retailers requiring masks isn’t new – especially in

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