Fall 2020 Reopening Plans At The Top 100 U.S. Business Schools

dhita yudha

They’ll be following all the rules this fall at the University of Michigan: masks, social distancing, smaller class sizes, frequent hand and surface washing, and more — much more. They’ll also be pioneering new rules for a new reality, particularly in the realm of remote instruction, as befits one of the country’s leading centers of social and cultural innovation. Put it all together and Scott DeRue, dean of the Ross School of Business, expects a memorable term.

“As with every year, I’m looking forward to welcoming students back to campus safely for a very successful fall term,” DeRue says. “Of course, I also recognize the profound difficulties that many of our students face in this moment, and that much uncertainty remains for all of us. We will get through this, and we will do it together.”

Five months after it shut down business school campuses and curtailed spring instruction and … Read More

Sacramento-area teachers react to plans for an online fall

dhita yudha

In the wake of the news that public school campuses in Sacramento County will stay closed when instruction resumes in the fall, teachers are reacting with mixtures of relief and concern for their students, all while preparing for the upcoming school year.

The Sacramento County Office of Education announced Wednesday that its 13 districts, which serve more than 250,000 students from kindergarten through high school, will continue distance learning programs they implemented in the spring through the fall. The decision, made by schools officials, comes amid rising Covid-19 cases in the state, country and county.

Lori Jablonski is a government and geography teacher at C.K. McClatchy High School. She said that, amid rising cases and growing restrictions, the decision was expected. But even before the announcement, she struggled with the challenges online learning will present.

“I’m trying to view this as a challenge we can meet. I love teaching, and

Read More

U.S. Government Backs Down On In-Person Requirement This Fall

dhita yudha

Harvard University sued the federal government to block sa proposed rule change that would have required foreign students to take some in-person classes this fall. File photo

Coronavirus cases are climbing across the country. Multiple states have sued. Universities, from the big names to the small, have voiced their opposition, and in some cases gone to court.

Now the government of Donald Trump is backing down from a rule change that would have required international students in the United States to take some in-person classes or risk having their visas revoked. The rule also would have barred foreign students from entry to the country if they planned to attend programs that will be entirely online this fall.

One day after 17 states and the District of Columbia filed a lawsuit in U.S. district court in Boston, Massachusetts, seeking to block the rule change — and less than a week after

Read More

4 things students should know about their health insurance and COVID-19 before heading to college this fall

dhita yudha

<span class="caption">College students should weigh their health insurance options if they take in-person classes this fall.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/young-woman-consulting-with-her-doctor-royalty-free-image/1245097085?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Geber86/GettyImages">Geber86/GettyImages</a></span>
College students should weigh their health insurance options if they take in-person classes this fall. Geber86/GettyImages

As colleges and universities decide whether or not to reopen their campuses this fall, much of the discussion has focused on the ethics behind the decision and the associated health risks of in-person instruction.

As a researcher who studies health insurance policy, I see two important gaps in this discussion: 1) Who should pay the cost of treating the inevitable COVID-19 cases that will occur; and 2) What do college students need to know about their coverage?

Here are four things I think every college student – and those who care about them – should know about health insurance coverage when it comes to COVID-19.

1. Weigh coverage options

If you’re covered under a student health insurance plan through your school, it may be worth considering whether that is still your best option. The

Read More

As Trump pressures schools to reopen, California’s 2 largest school districts say they’re going to start online only in the fall

dhita yudha

President Trump is seen outside the White House on July 11, 2020.
President Trump is seen outside the White House on July 11, 2020.

Joshua Roberts/Getty

  • The Los Angeles and San Diego unified school systems said they’ll be starting the fall semester off online in a joint statement. 

  • The announcement comes after President Donald Trump said he’d pressure states to reopen in-person classes in the fall. 

  • The two districts have a combined total of 700,000 students, according to NPR.

  • On Monday, public health officials in Los Angeles County announced 2,593 new cases of COVID-19 and 13 new deaths.

  • Other counties, like Orange County, California, voted on Monday to reopen schools without measures requiring masks or increased social distancing.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The Los Angeles and San Diego unified school systems announced that they’ll be going online only at the start of the fall semester, according to a joint statement.

“One fact is clear: those countries that have managed

Read More

My first reaction when I heard L.A. schools won’t be open this fall? Tears. Lots of them

dhita yudha

Hamilton High School on Los Angeles' Westside is among the Los Angeles Unified School District schools whose campuses will not open Aug. 18. <span class="copyright">(Los Angeles Times)</span>
Hamilton High School on Los Angeles’ Westside is among the Los Angeles Unified School District schools whose campuses will not open Aug. 18. (Los Angeles Times)

I’ll admit, I cried a bit when I heard that Los Angeles Unified School District students won’t be returning to their campuses next month. Instead, students will start the new school year they way the ended the last one — online and at home.

Like many parents, I’ve anxiously watched the calendar and the COVID-19 case numbers. In April, as California took its early victory lap for flattening the curve, I’d hoped my two kids could return to school full time in the fall. In June, as cases began to rise with reopening, I figured they’d have a couple days a week in the classroom and a couple days a week of distance learning.

Now, as coronavirus diagnoses and hospitalizations surge in L.A. County

Read More

LA and San Diego school districts will start fall classes online only; California orders statewide closures

dhita yudha

Two of the largest school districts in the U.S., the Los Angeles and San Diego unified school districts, said Monday that their academic years will start with only online instruction, as California continues to fight a surge of COVID-19 cases.  

The districts made the announcement in a joint statement and said their academic calendars will begin as scheduled – Aug. 18 for Los Angeles and Aug. 31 for San Diego. The statement added that both districts will plan to resume in-person learning “as soon as public health conditions allow.”

Also on Monday, Florida reported another alarming number of new coronavirus, as President Donald Trump displayed his frustration with the CDC and the World Health Organization’s director warned that the global pandemic is worsening.

“We need to reach a sustainable situation where we have adequate control of this virus without shutting down our lives entirely,” Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said Monday, adding

Read More

Online school? In-person? How parents are making their own fall 2020 decisions as COVID-19 squabbles continue

dhita yudha

As officials play political football with K-12 school re-openings, parents such as Johanne Davis are formulating their own game plans for the fall.

“To exercise an abundance of caution, I’d like to keep my kids home with me where they’ll study online,” says Davis, a mother of three from Indian Land, South Carolina, one of countless states where COVID-19 cases have spiked in recent weeks.

“Health is the issue, not just for my children, but also school workers,” says Davis. “Teachers shouldn’t have to be frontline soldiers in this pandemic.”

Families across the nation are busy making their own calculations about whether to send children back to school. While Davis seems resolved, many parents are still mulling.

Johanne Davis, left, in a photo with her three children. Davis and her husband say they're both fortunate enough to work from home and can manage the children if they have to spend a lot of next year studying remotely. But she acknowledges that hers is a privileged position not afforded to lower-income parents grappling with child care in order to go off to work.
Johanne Davis, left, in a photo with her three children. Davis and her husband say they’re both fortunate enough to work from home and can manage the children if they have to spend
Read More