Valleywise Health is helping unemployed people with health insurance questions | Arizona News

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PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) – Many people have lost their jobs due to the COVID-19 pandemic which has led to lapse in health insurance coverage. And with everything going on, it’s more important than ever to have access to health care coverage. 

When in this situation, many are overwhelmed and have a lot of questions. Valleywise Health wants to be able to take away from of the stress and answer your questions.

On Saturday from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m., Valleywise will be answering calls for anyone with health insurance questions through a phone bank. Callers will speak directly with certified eligibilty specialists from Valleywise Health.

“With unemployment rates at an all-time high and the uncertainty around COVID-19, Valleywise felt it their duty to help where they can so that families don’t delay care for fear of how to pay.”

Callers will get information about what they qualify for, how to

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Analysis finds 5.5M have lost health insurance amid pandemic

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Nearly 5.5 million people who lost their jobs between February and May of this year also lost their health insurance, according to a new analysis released Tuesday. 

The analysis from Families USA, a consumer health care advocacy organization, finds that the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic crisis have caused the greatest health insurance losses in American history. 

Nearly half of the coverage losses occurred in five states: California, Texas, Florida, New York and North Carolina. 

“Families in America are losing comprehensive health insurance in record numbers,” the authors of the analysis wrote. “This creates particularly serious dangers during a grave public health crisis and deep economic downturn.”

Coverage losses are likely steep because about half of Americans get health coverage through their jobs. 

However, the 5.4 million people who are estimated to have also lost their health insurance doesn’t count family members who might also have been on those

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What Is a Health Insurance Premium?

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When it comes to paying for health insurance, it’s important to understand your health insurance premiums, including how much you’re paying each month and their impact on your overall health care expenses.

Savvy health care consumers should consider ways to reduce the cost of premiums but also understand that they are just one component of medical costs, which can include deductibles, copayments and other fees.

Looking to understand these payments and how to lower their cost? Here’s what to know about health insurance premiums.

[Read: What Is Open Enrollment for Health Insurance?]

What Is a Health Insurance Premium?

Simply put, a health insurance premium is the regular fee paid to the insurance company or health plan to maintain coverage.

Make sure you understand how and when your premium is paid to ensure you’re keeping your insurance coverage active. If you access insurance through your employer, premiums may be automatically

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Star Of Bethlehem, Open Door Host Outdoor Health Fair Saturday

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OSSINING, NY — Star of Bethlehem Baptist Church and Open Door Family Center are joining forces to hold an outdoor health fair from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.

The free event will include coronavirus testing and rapid HIV testing, plus giveaways, including face masks and educational materials. Health experts will be on hand to talk about COVID-19 and protecting families.

“In light of how the virus has disproportionally affected people of color, I thought it was important for our congregants and others in the community to get tested and know of their status and how to protect themselves and their families,” said The Reverend Shaun Ellison Jones, senior pastor of Star of Bethlehem Baptist Church. “I know Open Door has been conducting testing at their sites for some time, but this will be the first large-scale community testing site from Sleepy Hollow to Cortlandt that I am aware of.”

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As millions lose health insurance, Trump administration offers little help

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President Trump and Seema Verma, the head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, shown at a White House meeting in 2017, have taken few steps to alert consumers to their options for health coverage. <span class="copyright">(Evan Vucci / AP)</span>
President Trump and Seema Verma, the head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, shown at a White House meeting in 2017, have taken few steps to alert consumers to their options for health coverage. (Evan Vucci / AP)

As millions of people lose jobs in the coronavirus outbreak, jeopardizing their health benefits, the Trump administration and many states are doing little if anything to connect Americans with other insurance coverage.

The U.S. Health and Human Services Department hasn’t launched any special effort to publicize the availability of Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program or health plans being sold on marketplaces created by the Affordable Care Act.

And federal officials haven’t made any substantial new commitment of money for outreach or to help people enroll in coverage.

In California and 11 other states that operate their own insurance marketplaces, state governments have created special enrollment periods to give people

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4 things students should know about their health insurance and COVID-19 before heading to college this fall

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<span class="caption">College students should weigh their health insurance options if they take in-person classes this fall.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/young-woman-consulting-with-her-doctor-royalty-free-image/1245097085?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Geber86/GettyImages">Geber86/GettyImages</a></span>
College students should weigh their health insurance options if they take in-person classes this fall. Geber86/GettyImages

As colleges and universities decide whether or not to reopen their campuses this fall, much of the discussion has focused on the ethics behind the decision and the associated health risks of in-person instruction.

As a researcher who studies health insurance policy, I see two important gaps in this discussion: 1) Who should pay the cost of treating the inevitable COVID-19 cases that will occur; and 2) What do college students need to know about their coverage?

Here are four things I think every college student – and those who care about them – should know about health insurance coverage when it comes to COVID-19.

1. Weigh coverage options

If you’re covered under a student health insurance plan through your school, it may be worth considering whether that is still your best option. The

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How a ‘perfect storm’ of issues during the pandemic has led to a mental health crisis in Latinx communities

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Design: Nathalie Cruz for Yahoo Life
Design: Nathalie Cruz for Yahoo Life

July is BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) Mental Health Month, also referred to as Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. In an effort to bring awareness to struggles that people of color face regarding mental health in the U.S., Yahoo Life is republishing this story. It was originally published on April 30, 2020 at 2:06 p.m. ET.

Experts say that many Latinx communities across the United States are in the midst of a mental health crisis during the coronavirus pandemic because of economic and public health disparities as well as cultural stigma around mental health issues.

Margarita Alegria, a professor at the Harvard Medical School and chief of the Disparities Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital, says the combination of stress over employment, lack of insurance and lack of information has created a perfect storm for Latinx communities. 

“These disparities have been amplified

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