parents turn to private schooling amid coronavirus

dhita yudha

<span>Photograph: John Moore/Getty Images</span>
Photograph: John Moore/Getty Images

Elyssa Katz, a Santa Monica mother of three, is growing a matchmaking service to connect families with tutors, or “Zutors”, as she calls them – a word she’s in the process of trademarking.

“The role of a Zutor is a tutor, a nanny, and an angel for a parent,” Katz told the Guardian, someone who can take over parental demands, help children with online homework and take them outside when it’s time for “recess”.

Katz’ clients range from the rich and famous, to everyday people who need childcare because they can’t look after their children while they have to work. Katz said she’s gotten calls from parents as far away as the Hamptons.

For a matchmaking fee that can range from $700 to $1,000 (£549 to £785), Katz and her team will interview tutor candidates, run background and reference checks, then match them to the right

Read More

Day cares welcome mask-wearing toddlers as parents struggle to ‘make best decision’ in COVID-19 world

dhita yudha

Sam DeRoze is almost 4 years old. After years of nanny care, he’s supposed to dive into his first organized school experience this fall. But the coronavirus pandemic has his mother mulling.

“I’ll need to see the plan from his preschool before I decide,” says Dianne DeRoze, a business consultant in Leesburg, Virginia. “If it’s safe and a positive experience, that’s valuable. What I don’t want is for him to have a knee-jerk reaction that school is this scary place you get dumped.”

DeRoze is among the millions of parents grappling with sending their children to preschool and babies to day care as cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, spike nationally.

The debate continues to rage among politicians and school officials on fall reopening plans. New York Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week that the city would be providing day care for 100,000 children to help

Read More

Daycares welcome mask-wearing toddlers as parents struggle to ‘make best decision’ in COVID-19 world

dhita yudha

Sam DeRoze is almost 4 years old. After years of nanny care, he’s supposed to dive into his first organized school experience this fall. But the coronavirus pandemic has his mother mulling.

“I’ll need to see the plan from his pre-school before I decide,” says Dianne DeRoze, a business consultant in Leesburg, Virginia. “If it’s safe and a positive experience, that’s valuable. What I don’t want is for him to have a knee-jerk reaction that school is this scary place you get dumped.”

DeRoze is among millions of parents grappling with the pros and cons of sending their children to preschool and babies to day care as cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, spike nationally.

The debate continues to rage between politicians and school officials on fall re-opening plans, while New York Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week that the city would be providing day care

Read More

‘Someone needs to help parents control their kids’ spending’

dhita yudha

The BBC’s weekly The Boss series profiles different business leaders from around the world. This week we speak to Louise Hill, founder of GoHenry, a banking business that provides debit cards for children.

Standing on the touchline as her son played football, Louise Hill started moaning about how her kids’ spending habits were spiralling out of control.

At the time her son was eight and her daughter was 11. Louise was so frustrated by how much they were buying online that she would pin Apple invoices to the fridge door to help her kids understand why their £4 a week pocket money was now just 50p.

The two other parents she was chatting to back in 2009 had similar stories, so the conversation really struck a chord. And inspired the beginning of a business.

“One of the dads started talking about how his son had bought something on eBay, the

Read More

Online school? In-person? How parents are making their own fall 2020 decisions as COVID-19 squabbles continue

dhita yudha

As officials play political football with K-12 school re-openings, parents such as Johanne Davis are formulating their own game plans for the fall.

“To exercise an abundance of caution, I’d like to keep my kids home with me where they’ll study online,” says Davis, a mother of three from Indian Land, South Carolina, one of countless states where COVID-19 cases have spiked in recent weeks.

“Health is the issue, not just for my children, but also school workers,” says Davis. “Teachers shouldn’t have to be frontline soldiers in this pandemic.”

Families across the nation are busy making their own calculations about whether to send children back to school. While Davis seems resolved, many parents are still mulling.

Johanne Davis, left, in a photo with her three children. Davis and her husband say they're both fortunate enough to work from home and can manage the children if they have to spend a lot of next year studying remotely. But she acknowledges that hers is a privileged position not afforded to lower-income parents grappling with child care in order to go off to work.
Johanne Davis, left, in a photo with her three children. Davis and her husband say they’re both fortunate enough to work from home and can manage the children if they have to spend
Read More