Valleywise Health is helping unemployed people with health insurance questions | Arizona News

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PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) – Many people have lost their jobs due to the COVID-19 pandemic which has led to lapse in health insurance coverage. And with everything going on, it’s more important than ever to have access to health care coverage. 

When in this situation, many are overwhelmed and have a lot of questions. Valleywise Health wants to be able to take away from of the stress and answer your questions.

On Saturday from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m., Valleywise will be answering calls for anyone with health insurance questions through a phone bank. Callers will speak directly with certified eligibilty specialists from Valleywise Health.

“With unemployment rates at an all-time high and the uncertainty around COVID-19, Valleywise felt it their duty to help where they can so that families don’t delay care for fear of how to pay.”

Callers will get information about what they qualify for, how to

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Coronavirus: Money questions to ask your partner in a crisis

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Aaron Clarke is a certified financial planner and wealth advisor at Halpern Financial.

Money can often be a complicated topic with your partner in normal times, but the pandemic has only increased that financial stress for many couples. Even in the best of times, if there is a misalignment of what each person finds important and the couple can’t talk about these differences, it is bound to be a pain point.

Here are a few helpful ways to navigate challenging financial times with your spouse or partner — and maybe even improve your long-term financial picture at the same time.

A couple wearing masks are seen hugging on the sidewalk as the city enters Phase 4 of re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on July 21, 2020 in New York City. (Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images)
A couple wearing masks are seen hugging on the sidewalk as the city enters Phase 4 of re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on July 21, 2020 in New York City. (Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images)

Even beyond the traditional “are you a saver or a

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How soon will the extra $600 in jobless benefits go away? Your money questions answered

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It’s hard out there. And, in this time of uncertainty, USA TODAY is working to find answers to your money questions – anything from stimulus checks or unemployment benefits to your 401(k) or retirement plans. You can submit your questions here and read earlier answers below. We will be updating the Q&A, so check back often. But, also look to these places:

Answer: Yes. Unless Congress takes immediate action, the extra $600 will end on July 25 in every state but New York where it will end on July 26.

Answer: In some states, the benefit will shrink by more than half. In Arizona, the maximum weekly benefit is $240. In Florida, Alabama, and Tennessee, it is $275 per week. Check with your state’s department to determine you’re your benefit will be.

Answer: That’s unclear. Currently, another coronavirus relief package likely won’t be approved until after July, policymakers say.

Answer: … Read More

What’s Safe To Do Right Now? The Most Common COVID-19 Questions, Answered

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With states in various stages of reopening, coronavirus cases are increasing across the country. And without standardized guidelines on how we’re supposed to behave, everyone seems to be living by their own rules.

Many of us are wondering: What is actually safe to do right now? Is it safe to fly or stay at a hotel? What about a road trip? Can you go to the dentist, restaurant or gym? 

HuffPost hosted a COVID-19 Q&A with Dr. Kavita Patel, HuffPost’s medical contributor and a practicing internal medicine physician in Washington, D.C., and Lindsay Holmes, HuffPost’s senior wellness editor, to get answers during this confusing time. Below are the most common questions readers asked during the event and some guidance on what to do:

Is it safe to go to restaurants right now? 

Patel: While there have been no reported cases of contracting the virus from prepared food, there have

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9 questions to help vet your back-to-school choices

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In Brandon Wislocki’s fifth grade class this spring in California, daily virtual classes were an experiment in creativity.

The Zoom sessions featured guitar playing, group discussions about literature, live math lessons, checks for understanding through Zoom’s chat function and silly games, such as Oreo stacking and household scavenger hunts.

The remote lessons featured something many students didn’t get this spring when the coronavirus forced instruction online: the learning of new material.

Wislocki’s students at Stonegate Elementary in Irvine, California, still covered the core math and English standards that would have been taught in person from mid-March to the end of the school year. 

Brandon Wislocki, a fifth grade teacher at Stonegate Elementary School in Irvine, Calif., starts many of his virtual classes by singing to students.
Brandon Wislocki, a fifth grade teacher at Stonegate Elementary School in Irvine, Calif., starts many of his virtual classes by singing to students.

The experience suggests online learning doesn’t have to be bad. There are ways to make it more engaging and effective, education experts said. But

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9 questions to ask to vet your back-to-school choices

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In Brandon Wislocki’s fifth-grade class this spring in California, daily virtual classes were an experiment in creativity.

The Zoom sessions featured guitar playing, group discussions about literature, live math lessons, checks for understanding through Zoom’s chat function, and silly games, such as Oreo-stacking and household scavenger hunts.

The remote lessons also featured something many students didn’t get this spring when the coronavirus forced instruction online: the learning of new material.

Wislocki’s students at Stonegate Elementary in Irvine, California, still covered the core math and English standards that otherwise would have been taught in-person between mid-March and the end of the year. 

Brandon Wislocki, a fifth-grade teacher at Stonegate Elementary School in Irvine, California, started many of his virtual classes by singing to students.
Brandon Wislocki, a fifth-grade teacher at Stonegate Elementary School in Irvine, California, started many of his virtual classes by singing to students.

The experience suggests online learning doesn’t have to be bad. In fact, there are ways to make it more engaging and effective, education experts say. But schools

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I wasn’t laid off but COVID-19 cut my hours. Can I get unemployment? Your money questions, answered

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It’s hard out there. And, in this time of uncertainty, USA TODAY is working to find answers to your money questions – anything from stimulus checks or unemployment benefits to your 401(k) or retirement plans. You can submit your questions here and read earlier answers below.

We will be updating the Q&A, so check back often. But, also look to these places:

… I thought the CARES Act was supposed to help. I’m losing my entire mortgage payment per month and my hours have decreased, but I don’t qualify for anything, the unemployment office said.

Each state has its own guidelines, according to the Department of Labor, but you may be eligible for unemployment if you:

The CARES Act can support short-term compensation programs where employers reduce hours instead of laying off, and employees receive prorated unemployment benefits. But it depends on your state, according to Lisa Greene-Lewis, a certified … Read More