3 New York City businesses on what it’s been like reopening in the first U.S. epicenter of the pandemic

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New York City quickly became the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States this past spring. As the novel coronavirus has spread rapidly elsewhere nationwide, New York has been able to bring cases down and began to reopen businesses this summer, making it a possible blueprint for other American cities once they have the virus under control.

Anyone who has ventured out to a store or small business that is not a grocery store or a pharmacy (which are also quite different than they used to be but remained open during the shutdown) knows that retail experiences and services are not like what they once were. There are a lot of new rules put in place to keep customers and employees safe, which might look very different

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Which Country Gets High Marks for Reopening Schools?

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Carl Court/Getty
Carl Court/Getty

As American school officials debate when it will be safe for schoolchildren to return to classrooms, looking abroad may offer insights. Nearly every country in the world shuttered their schools early in the COVID-19 pandemic. Many have since sent students back to class, with varying degrees of success.

I am a scholar of comparative international education. For this article, I examined what happened in four countries where K-12 schools either stayed open throughout the pandemic or have resumed in-person instruction, using press reports, national COVID-19 data and academic studies.

Here’s what I found.

Israel: Too much, too soon

Israel took stringent steps early on in the coronavirus pandemic, including severely restricting everyone’s movement and closing all schools. By June, it was being lauded internationally for containing the spread of COVID-19.

But shortly after schools reopened in May, on a staggered schedule paired with mask mandates and social distancing

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Success Academy Offers Sobering Lesson for Reopening NYC Schools

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(Bloomberg) — If any school in America could find an edge just now — a magic way to reopen kindergarten or teach Algebra online — you might think it was one beloved by Wall Street millionaires and billionaires.

But not even Success Academy, the largest charter-school network in New York, the nation’s largest school district, has easy answers for teaching kids during this pandemic.

As school districts everywhere weigh bringing students back against the risks of spreading the virus, Success Academy offers a sobering lesson about how daunting that calculus has become. This much is certain: reopening schools is now one of the most formidable obstacles to fully reopening New York — and the nation’s entire economy.

Over the years, Success Academy has formed ties with the likes of hedge fund luminaries Dan Loeb, Ken Griffin and John Paulson, who have collectively lavished tens of millions on the network and

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Teachers sue Florida governor over school reopening plan

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The Florida Education Association, a union representing 145,000 educators, filed a lawsuit on Monday against Governor Ron DeSantis and the state’s Department of Education in an attempt to stop schools from reopening at the end of August. The lawsuit argues Florida’s plan to reopen schools is unsafe due to the coronavirus pandemic, and therefore violates the state constitution, CBS Miami reports.

“The Florida Constitution mandates ‘[a]dequate provision shall be made by law for a uniform, efficient, safe, secure, and high quality system of free public schools,'” the lawsuit says. “The Defendants’ unconstitutional handling of their duties has infringed upon this mandate and requires the courts to issue necessary and appropriate relief.”

The lawsuit also names Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran and Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez as defendants. 

“The governor needs to accept the reality of the situation here in Florida, where the virus is surging out of control,” FEA

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Fall 2020 Reopening Plans At The Top 100 U.S. Business Schools

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They’ll be following all the rules this fall at the University of Michigan: masks, social distancing, smaller class sizes, frequent hand and surface washing, and more — much more. They’ll also be pioneering new rules for a new reality, particularly in the realm of remote instruction, as befits one of the country’s leading centers of social and cultural innovation. Put it all together and Scott DeRue, dean of the Ross School of Business, expects a memorable term.

“As with every year, I’m looking forward to welcoming students back to campus safely for a very successful fall term,” DeRue says. “Of course, I also recognize the profound difficulties that many of our students face in this moment, and that much uncertainty remains for all of us. We will get through this, and we will do it together.”

Five months after it shut down business school campuses and curtailed spring instruction and … Read More

How New York Galleries Are Reopening

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Click here to read the full article.

In mid-March, as the coronavirus pandemic brought New York to a standstill, many galleries had to shutter for a month-long period. Now, as New York City’s reopening continues apace, those art spaces are beginning to reopen their doors with increased safety precautions. Many ask visitors to book appointments online before stopping by, and some have taken extra precautions of other kinds.

Galleries across the city have begun to implement Acuity Scheduling’s digital appointment system, which many have started using on their websites. Among those using the system are Chelsea galleries Kasmin, Greene Naftali, and Galerie Lelong & Co., as well as the Lower East Side’s Derek Eller Gallery and Tribeca’s James Cohan. But for most, a digital system wasn’t enough to reopen as the city moved into Phase III of its reopening—changes to the physical layout of the gallery had to be made

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In the Same Towns, Private Schools Are Reopening While Public Schools Are Not

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Punahou School in Honolulu, on Mach 9, 2007, will be open full time in the fall of 2020, in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. (Cory Lum/The New York Times)
Punahou School in Honolulu, on Mach 9, 2007, will be open full time in the fall of 2020, in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. (Cory Lum/The New York Times)

In Honolulu, nearly all public schools are planning to allow students to return for just part of the week. But at Punahou, a private school for grades kindergarten through 12, school will open full time for everyone.

The school has an epidemiologist on staff and is installing thermal scanners in the hallways to take people’s temperatures as they walk by. It has a new commons area and design lab as well as an 80-acre campus that students can use to spread out. There were already two teachers for 25 children, so it will be easy to cut classes in half to meet public health requirements for small, consistent groups.

The same thing is happening in communities across the country: Public

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Cost of ensuring school safety complicates reopening plans

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As school districts across the country decide how and when they can bring students back to campus safely, a major sticking point is emerging: the money to make it happen.

Keeping public schools for 50 million students and more than 7 million staff safe from the coronavirus could require more teachers and substitutes, nurses and custodians. School districts will need to find more buses to allow for more space between children and buy more computers for distance learning. They’ll need to buy sanitizer, masks and other protective equipment. Some are putting up plastic dividers in offices and classrooms.

While public health concerns are getting most of the attention, especially with the nation’s infections and hospitalizations rising, costs have become a major consideration. Many districts are hoping Congress will step in.

The Council of Chief State School Officers says safely reopening public schools could cost between $158 billion and $245 billion,

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Schools Should Prioritize Reopening, But They Need A Lot More Money: New Report

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Schools should try to reopen if they think they can do so safely, prioritizing students with disabilities and children in kindergarten through fifth grade, according to a report released Wednesday. However, schools likely won’t be able to take all the necessary precautions without an injection of resources from states and the federal government. 

The new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, which compiles months of research from education and medical experts, offers one of the most comprehensive looks at the costs and benefits of U.S. schools reopening amid the coronavirus pandemic. Over its more than 80 pages, the report outlines the potentially dire health risks communities could face if schools are reopened hastily and asks school and community leaders to engage in constant risk assessment.

Although the report ultimately stresses the importance of providing students with in-person learning opportunities, it also details the tremendous challenges that

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