Health Insurance Options When Leaving a Job

Question: I’m thinking about leaving my job and starting my own business, but I’ll lose my health insurance from work. Can I sign up for coverage through HealthCare.gov now, or do I have to wait until open enrollment?

Answer: You usually need to wait until open enrollment to buy individual health insurance, but you can get coverage anytime during the year if you’re eligible for a “special enrollment period.” To qualify, you must have experienced one of several life changes, which include leaving your job and losing your employer health coverage; moving to a new zip code; getting married; having a baby or adopting a child; or losing health insurance because you got divorced or legally separated. If you qualify for a special enrollment period, you usually have up to 60 days following the event to enroll in a new health insurance plan. See Healthcare.gov for more information about special

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With job losses, workers and their families lose health insurance coverage

What’s going on with extra COVID-19 unemployment benefits?

It’s been weeks since President Donald Trump signed an executive memorandum that was supposed to get the federal government back into the business of topping up unemployment benefits, to $400 a week. Few states, however, are currently paying even part of the benefit that the president promised. And, it looks like, in most states, the maximum additional benefit unemployment recipients will be able to get is $300.

What’s the latest on evictions?

For millions of Americans, things are looking grim. Unemployment is high, and pandemic eviction moratoriums have expired in states across the country. And as many people already know, eviction is something that can haunt a person’s life for years. For instance, getting evicted can make it hard to rent again. And that can lead to spiraling poverty.

Which retailers are requiring that people wear masks when shopping? And how are

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Study Shows Health Care Prices Have Risen While Previous Insurance Coverage Has Leveled Off

September 11, 2020 at 12:01 am ET

High prices, widening gaps in insurance coverage and racial disparities in outcomes are tied to wide state-level variation in health care performance that will likely be exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic, according to a sweeping new report from The Commonwealth Fund.

The analysis, which assessed all 50 states and the District of Columbia on dozens of measures tracking health care quality and costs, health outcomes and disparities, indicates Americans’ health care burden and risk of poor health varies widely based on where they live. While the data predates the COVID-19 crisis, researchers said the pandemic could worsen these state-level disparities, “leaving people in poorly performing states even further behind.”

The report notes a few key issues: Because most Americans get their health insurance through an employer, recent job losses are estimated to leave 3.5 million people uninsured by the end of the year,

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Californa’s Stronger ‘Mental Health Parity’ Bill Awaits Governor’s Signature : Shots

Los Angeles County last fall unveiled one of its 10 Department of Mental Health vans aimed at, among other things, reducing long waiting periods for the transport of individuals experiencing a mental health crisis.

Damian Dovarganes/AP


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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Los Angeles County last fall unveiled one of its 10 Department of Mental Health vans aimed at, among other things, reducing long waiting periods for the transport of individuals experiencing a mental health crisis.

Damian Dovarganes/AP

There are already federal and state laws on the books requiring insurance companies to cover mental health treatments, just as it does medical treatments and procedures such as chemotherapy or a cesarean section. But many patient advocates say those laws haven’t gone far enough because they permit insurance companies to pay for care only after the mental illness has reached a late-stage crisis, or let companies deny coverage outright. So states, including

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South Shore Health hires investment bank to explore strategic options

The parent company of South Shore Hospital said Wednesday that a merger with another health care network is among the options likely on the table as it begins the second phase of a strategic review.



a car parked in front of a building: South Shore Hospital in South Weymouth.


© Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff
South Shore Hospital in South Weymouth.

Rose Di Pietro, interim chief executive of South Shore Health, said in an e-mail to employees that the nonprofit health system has hired investment bank Cain Brothers to “help sharpen our focus on exploring opportunities for future direction.”

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The move is the next step in a review that begin in January with an eye toward how to adapt to changes in the health care industry. That effort was slowed by the onset of the coronavirus pandemic.

In an interview, Di Pietro said South Shore Health has “no preconceived notions” on what steps it may take as a result of the review being done

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Valleywise Health is helping unemployed people with health insurance questions | Arizona News

PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) – Many people have lost their jobs due to the COVID-19 pandemic which has led to lapse in health insurance coverage. And with everything going on, it’s more important than ever to have access to health care coverage. 

When in this situation, many are overwhelmed and have a lot of questions. Valleywise Health wants to be able to take away from of the stress and answer your questions.

On Saturday from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m., Valleywise will be answering calls for anyone with health insurance questions through a phone bank. Callers will speak directly with certified eligibilty specialists from Valleywise Health.

“With unemployment rates at an all-time high and the uncertainty around COVID-19, Valleywise felt it their duty to help where they can so that families don’t delay care for fear of how to pay.”

Callers will get information about what they qualify for, how to

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What Is a Health Insurance Premium?

When it comes to paying for health insurance, it’s important to understand your health insurance premiums, including how much you’re paying each month and their impact on your overall health care expenses.

Savvy health care consumers should consider ways to reduce the cost of premiums but also understand that they are just one component of medical costs, which can include deductibles, copayments and other fees.

Looking to understand these payments and how to lower their cost? Here’s what to know about health insurance premiums.

[Read: What Is Open Enrollment for Health Insurance?]

What Is a Health Insurance Premium?

Simply put, a health insurance premium is the regular fee paid to the insurance company or health plan to maintain coverage.

Make sure you understand how and when your premium is paid to ensure you’re keeping your insurance coverage active. If you access insurance through your employer, premiums may be automatically

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Star Of Bethlehem, Open Door Host Outdoor Health Fair Saturday

OSSINING, NY — Star of Bethlehem Baptist Church and Open Door Family Center are joining forces to hold an outdoor health fair from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.

The free event will include coronavirus testing and rapid HIV testing, plus giveaways, including face masks and educational materials. Health experts will be on hand to talk about COVID-19 and protecting families.

“In light of how the virus has disproportionally affected people of color, I thought it was important for our congregants and others in the community to get tested and know of their status and how to protect themselves and their families,” said The Reverend Shaun Ellison Jones, senior pastor of Star of Bethlehem Baptist Church. “I know Open Door has been conducting testing at their sites for some time, but this will be the first large-scale community testing site from Sleepy Hollow to Cortlandt that I am aware of.”

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As millions lose health insurance, Trump administration offers little help

President Trump and Seema Verma, the head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, shown at a White House meeting in 2017, have taken few steps to alert consumers to their options for health coverage. <span class="copyright">(Evan Vucci / AP)</span>
President Trump and Seema Verma, the head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, shown at a White House meeting in 2017, have taken few steps to alert consumers to their options for health coverage. (Evan Vucci / AP)

As millions of people lose jobs in the coronavirus outbreak, jeopardizing their health benefits, the Trump administration and many states are doing little if anything to connect Americans with other insurance coverage.

The U.S. Health and Human Services Department hasn’t launched any special effort to publicize the availability of Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program or health plans being sold on marketplaces created by the Affordable Care Act.

And federal officials haven’t made any substantial new commitment of money for outreach or to help people enroll in coverage.

In California and 11 other states that operate their own insurance marketplaces, state governments have created special enrollment periods to give people

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4 things students should know about their health insurance and COVID-19 before heading to college this fall

<span class="caption">College students should weigh their health insurance options if they take in-person classes this fall.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/young-woman-consulting-with-her-doctor-royalty-free-image/1245097085?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Geber86/GettyImages">Geber86/GettyImages</a></span>
College students should weigh their health insurance options if they take in-person classes this fall. Geber86/GettyImages

As colleges and universities decide whether or not to reopen their campuses this fall, much of the discussion has focused on the ethics behind the decision and the associated health risks of in-person instruction.

As a researcher who studies health insurance policy, I see two important gaps in this discussion: 1) Who should pay the cost of treating the inevitable COVID-19 cases that will occur; and 2) What do college students need to know about their coverage?

Here are four things I think every college student – and those who care about them – should know about health insurance coverage when it comes to COVID-19.

1. Weigh coverage options

If you’re covered under a student health insurance plan through your school, it may be worth considering whether that is still your best option. The

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